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[1]

USS Hopewell under steam.

Career (U.S.)
Name: USS Hopewell (DD-181)
Namesake: Pollard Hopewell
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding
Laid down: 19 January 1918
Launched: 8 June 1918
Commissioned: 22 March 1919-17 July 1922

17 June 1940-23 September 1940

Fate: Transferred to UK, 23 September 1940
Career (UK and Norway)
Name: HMS Bath (I17) and HNoMS Bath
Commissioned: 23 September 1940
Fate: Sunk in battle, 19 August 1941
General characteristics
Class and type: Wickes-class destroyer
Displacement: 1,060 long tons (1,080 t)
Length: 314 ft 5 in (95.83 m)
Beam: 31 ft 8 in (9.65 m)
Draft: 9 ft 4 in (2.84 m)
Propulsion: 2 × steam turbines2 × shafts
Speed: 35 kn (40 mph; 65 km/h)
Complement: 101 officers and enlisted
Armament: 4 × 4 in (100 mm) guns

2 × 3 in (76 mm) 4 × 21 in (530 mm) torpedo tubes

The first USS Hopewell (DD–181) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. She was later transferred to the Royal Navy as HMS Bath (I-17), a "Town"-class destroyer.

ContentsEdit

[hide] *1 Service history

Service historyEdit

As USS HopewellEdit

Named for Pollard Hopewell, she was launched by Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia on 8 June 1918; sponsored by Mrs. Orote Hutcheson; and commissioned on 22 March 1919 at Portsmouth, Virginia, Lieutenant Commander R. E. Rodgers in command.

Hopewell sailed from Norfolk on 19 April 1919 to join the 3rd Destroyer Squadron in New England waters, and in May was on observation station off the Azores during the historic crossing of the Atlantic by Navy seaplanes. The destroyer returned to New York on 8 June to complete her interrupted fitting out, and rejoined her squadron in August for firing tests. The winter of 1920 was spent on intensive training and target practice in Caribbean waters.

The ship returned to New England in early May, where she remained until September training reservists and engaging in division maneuvers. Arriving Charlestonon 22 September, Hopewell carried out similar operations out of the South Carolina port, returning to New York in May 1921 for reserve training. Sailing from Newport on 10 October, the destroyer was placed in reserve at Charleston until 10 April, when she departed for Philadelphia. Hopewell decommissioned there on 17 July 1922.

She recommissioned on 17 June 1940 as America prepared for World War II, and after operating with the Neutrality Patrol off New England arrived Halifax on 18 September. She decommissioned on 23 September and was transferred to Great Britain as part of the Destroyers for Bases Agreement.

As HMS Bath and HNoMS BathEdit

Renamed HMS Bath, she was manned by sailors of the exiled Royal Norwegian Navy, in April 1941. As HNoMS Bath she began operation as part of the "Liverpool Escort Force" early in June, but had a very brief subsequent career, being sunk by the German submarine U-204 on 19 August 1941, while escorting the convoy, OG-71, bound for Gibraltar. She was hit in the engine room with a torpedo and broke in two, sinking in three minutes. Of her 128 crew, only 42 survived.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

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